Military Postcards, United States

A Big Bang Out of Army Life! [1944 – Camp McFearson/ Atlanta, Georgia]

Camp McFearson Atlanta, GA - postcard image lg

Is Private W.E. Prince coming or going? He mentions being stationed soon, but this postcard was sent relatively late in the war.

During World War II, Camp McPherson served as a major intake and discharge point for servicemen and women. Later renamed “Fort McPherson,” the Atlanta, Georgia installation has a long and storied past, a prominent participant in U.S. Army history from the Civil War up through the 21st century.

Camp McFearson Atlanta, GA - postcard message lg

Saturday 7:30 P.M.

Well I’m still in Georgia. Will be here untill Mon I guess. How is everybody? I am fine. Will write when I get stationed.

Evans

From: PVT W.E. Prince
Camp McFearson, GA

To: Mrs. W.E. Prince
c/o Armour Mince
R#1 Columbia, Tenn.

Postmark: Atlanta, Georgia – Oct 1, 1944

Image: WWII Comic Postcard “I’m getting a big bang out of army life!”

Continue reading “A Big Bang Out of Army Life! [1944 – Camp McFearson/ Atlanta, Georgia]”

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Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Reception Committee [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

1943 Comic Postcard Image - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Who is Sergeant Graves? And why is he after Dick Chapman? Why is the quality of the milk important information to share? Was Pvt Chapman a fabled milk man before he was drafted or enlisted to serve?

Also, I’m not sure how I feel about the artwork. Are they jeering or cheering? Both?

So many questions.

1943 Comic Postcard Message - Jefferson Bks Missouri lg

Dear Tyson,

I am a Pvt in the Air Corps. Sgt Graves hasn’t got me yet. Tell everyone Hello. Milk out here is good.

Dick

To: Mr. Felix Tyson / c/o Crescent Hill Milk Service / Gallatin, Tennessee

From: Pvt R. Q. Chapman, Sqd. A 24 L. G.
Army Air Corps
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri

Postmark: Jefferson Barracks, Missouri – March 23, 1943

Front Artwork: WWII Army Airborne Comic “They had a reception committee here to meet me!” made by Beals, Des Moines, Iowa

——————-

Related postcards

Also sent by Pvt. R. Q. Chapman:  If you don’t pull the string! [1943 – Jefferson Barracks, Missouri]

Military Postcards, North America, Postcards

I wouldn’t trade my place with anybody. [1941 – Ellington Field, TX]

1941 Comic Postcard Image - Ellington Field, Texas lg

Such a charming message with positive sentiment from this soldier who only left us his initials. Ellington Field (where this card was postmarked) was a significant military installation for the war effort in the 1940’s, offering advanced flight training for bomber pilots (Wikipedia).

Due to favorable weather patterns (well, at least most of the time) surrounding its location near Houston, Texas, Ellington Field has served as a significant aviation operations center for the U.S. Military since the First World War. It’s legacy continues as the present “Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base,” serving the Texas Air National Guard, Johnson Space Center (NASA), and other active duty units (source: Wikipedia).

1941 Comic Postcard Message - Ellington Field, Texas lg

August 18-1941

Dear friend

I just thought I would write you and send this card along at the same time. Everything on the other side pertains to me except the last line. I wouldn’t trade my place with anybody. Believe it or not that is a picture of me on the other side. I think I’ll get to come home next Saturday. Well this leaves me still a kicking and doing fine.

So long. RRH

To: Miss Martha Bolton / Buckholts, Texas

Postmark: Ellington Field, Texas – Aug 19, 1941 – 1 cent stamp

Continue reading “I wouldn’t trade my place with anybody. [1941 – Ellington Field, TX]”

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

I got your clock. [1954 – U.S. Army Air Force, London]

1954 U.S. Army Air Force Postcard - London Image lg

The postmark caught my eye on this one. Ray sent this card from a military post office, presumably RAF Lakenheath (APO 09179). It’s a military post mark, which reads: “U.S. Army Air Force Postal Service,” and apparently was still being used long after the separate “U.S. Air Force” was created in 1947. The U.S. Air Force, to this day, maintains a presence at RAF Lakenheath (http://www.lakenheath.af.mil/).

1954 U.S. Army Air Force Postcard - London message lg

Hi Folks.

I got your clock shiped it about 3 weeks ago. You should get it sometime next month. It is insured in case anything is broken.

Ray.

To:
Mr. Wallace King
Route 2
Crofton, KY

Postmark: U.S. Army Air Force Postal Service 179  – 27 October 1954

Image: London, The Houses of Parliament

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

A Full House: Coastal Artillery [1943-Watsonville, California]

1943 Comic Postcard image - Watsonville California lg

Private Ellis jotted this quick and lighthearted note to a friend while stationed on the West Coast. Camp McQuaide was an active post during WWII which specialized in Coastal Artillery, and was located on the Pacific coast in Santa Cruz County, California. (source).

1943 Comic Postcard message - Watsonville California lg

Hello Sarg

How is Trisha[?] by now. As for me everything is OK. Save that da[?] for I am going to get that furlow sometime. I hope. Ha Ha.

Love Mart

From:
Pvt. Marvin H. Ellis
Btry C 102 Trng Bn.
Camp McQuaide, California U.S. Army

To:
Mr. Ed Mathis
Detroit, Michigan

Postmark: Watsonville, California – Jan 18, 1943 Continue reading “A Full House: Coastal Artillery [1943-Watsonville, California]”

Commentary, Military Postcards

Gory, Gory, what a Hell of a… National Airborne Day

Curtiss : C-46 : Commando

In honor of National Airborne Day, here’s a bit of dark paratrooper humor.

Presumably intended to instill proper respect for the grim dangers of jump school, Blood on the Risers has been sung by U.S. Army Airborne trainees since WWII and follows the tune of Battle Hymn of the Republic.

Have a listen.

Blood on the Risers

He was just a rookie trooper and he surely shook with fright,

He checked all his equipment and made sure his pack was tight;

He had to sit and listen to those awful engines roar,

“You ain’t gonna jump no more!”

(CHORUS)

Gory, gory, what a hell of a way to die,

Gory, gory, what a hell of a way to die,

Gory, gory, what a hell of a way to die,

He ain’t gonna jump no more!

“Is everybody happy?” cried the Sergeant looking up,

Our Hero feebly answered “Yes,” and then they stood him up;

He jumped into the icy blast, his static line unhooked,

And he ain’t gonna jump no more.

Continue reading “Gory, Gory, what a Hell of a… National Airborne Day”

Europe, Military Postcards, Postcards

No sign of moving yet [1919 – Bar-le-Duc, France]

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 back lg

The Treaty of Versailles had not yet been signed, but Umberger can certainly see the light at the end of the tunnel. With a location-less postmark from the U.S. Army Postal Service, there’s no telling exactly from where in Europe this postcard was sent.  Umberger would likely have been in the vicinity of Bar-le-Duc at some point to have acquired the image of this town in Northwest France. Hopefully he arrived back on American soil not long after his postcard did.

I have two postcards from this WWI soldier, A.C. Umberger. Here is the other, sent in March 1919.

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 lg

A pretty nice place. Hope to be home soon to play with you but there is no sign of moving yet.

Yours

A.C. Umberger

To:

  • Miss Jean T. Hunter
  • 326 E. Bucynus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: U.S. Army Postal Service, Feb 18, 1919 / “Passed as censored” stamp

Image: Bar-le-Duc

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

TH-55 Osage Helicopter [1984 – Dothan, Alabama]

1984 Dothan, Alabama postcard image helicopter lg

I imagine that this postcard was sent by someone with a connection to Fort Rucker (located near Dothan, Alabama), which remains 30 years later the home of Army Aviation and the flight school for the Army’s rotary wing pilots. I can personally attest to the fact that there are many spiders and snakes in Lower Alabama, as mentioned by Brad, the sender.

For more info about the training aircraft pictured: Hughes TH-55 Osage Helicopter

1984 Dothan, Alabama postcard message lg

Hi Friends!

Tim, I really enjoyed our phone call the other night. Don’t forget about the spiders and snakes headed my way in a week or so, okay? You both take care and keep thinking about January, also know that you two cross my thoughts fondly very often.

More later, Brad

The Hughes TH-55A “Osage” Helicopter

The Huges TH-55A is the helicopter used by the U.S. Army for primary training of Army pilots in rotary wing aircraft. The army aviation training facilities are located at Fort Rucker in southeast Alabama. Every pilot will long remember his first “Solo” in the TH-55A, even after years of flying in far more sophisticated aircraft.

Postmark: Dothan, AL – October 29, 1984

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Out Where the West Begins [1942, Utah]

Marress - 1942 Utah image lg

Lloyd Marress WII Postcard Series (#1 of 5)

August 1942

Here we find Pvt. “Buddy” Marress in Utah, Summer of 1942. I wonder how well he knows Gladys Bell. The wording is familiar, but a bit stiff.

I have to say, as an East coast native myself, I don’t care too much for the poem over-idealizing “the West” with such saccharine poetry. Oh well.

Info about Kearns Air Base, constructed near Salt Lake City during WWII.

Marress - 1942 Utah message lg

Wed-Nite

I’m so glad the Dr. thought you were doing fine. You’ll be a big girl, if you keep going. I enjoyed the letter from Mrs. Bell a lot. I’ll write more next time. I’m studying hard, as usual.

I love you, Buddy

To:

  • Gladys Bell
  • Lobelville, Tennessee

From:

  • Pvt. Lloyd Marress
  • Army Air base Salt Lake City

Postmark: Salt Lake City, Utah – Aug 1942

“Buy Defense Savings Bonds and Stamps” No postage: Military Mail

Image: Out Where the West Begins poem.


Other postcards sent by Lloyd “Buddy” Marress

Military Postcards, Postcards, United States

Sgt. Marress [1943 – Topeka, Kansas]

Marress - Aug 1943 Topeka Image lg

Lloyd Marress WWII Postcard Series (#3 of 5)

August 1943

This time we find Buddy, a Sergeant now, writing to his wife in Tennessee. He most likely was serving with the 21st Bombardment Wing which was located in Topeka, Kansas as of May 1943 (Wikipedia). The primary function of Buddy’s unit was “processing heavy bombardment crews and aircraft for overseas movement, and then processing men returning from overseas, from 1942–1946.” He seems to be staying stateside for the war, so perhaps he was an aircraft mechanic or other tradesman prepping bombers for overseas deployment.

I wonder if this postcard was provided for free by the United Service Organization (USO). I’m not sure what else “U.S.O.” could possibly stand for in this context.

Link: History of the Topeka Airport (aka Topeka Army Airfield in 1943).

Marress - Aug 1943 Topeka message lg

Saturday Evening

Darling,

I’m staying on the base tonite, as I said I will. I didn’t work this aft. got caught up on my work, at last.

I hope you’re feeling alright, s–[?] the old medicine made you sick.

I’ll go now, but[?] will be back tomorrow.

Forever yours, Buddy

To:

  • Mrs. L. H. Marress
  • Lobelville, Tennessee

From:

  • Sgt. L.H. Marress
  • 21st Sq. (S)
  • Topeka, Kansas

Postmark: Aug 29, 1943 – Topeka, Kansas

Image: “From Topeka Kansas U.S.O” John Morrell & Co. Meat packing Promo Postcard featuring Kansas Jayhawk


Other postcards from Buddy Marress

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