Military Postcards, Postcards

No sign of moving yet [1919 – Bar-le-Duc, France]

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 back lg

The Treaty of Versailles had not yet been signed, but Umberger can certainly see the light at the end of the tunnel. With a location-less postmark from the U.S. Army Postal Service, there’s no telling exactly from where in Europe this postcard was sent.  Umberger would likely have been in the vicinity of Bar-le-Duc at some point to have acquired the image of this town in Northwest France. Hopefully he arrived back on American soil not long after his postcard did.

I have two postcards from this WWI soldier, A.C. Umberger. Here is the other, sent in March 1919.

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 lg

A pretty nice place. Hope to be home soon to play with you but there is no sign of moving yet.

Yours

A.C. Umberger

To:

  • Miss Jean T. Hunter
  • 326 E. Bucynus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: U.S. Army Postal Service, Feb 18, 1919 / “Passed as censored” stamp

Image: Bar-le-Duc

Postcards

For Mother’s Day, One More Happy Golden Ray

Mother's Poem Postcard - Rochester 1910s

My parents gave me this antique card to add to my collection. It’s a sweet poem from mother to daughter. The content of the writing indicates that there is distance between them, but since it has no address or postmark, perhaps it was sent in an envelope.

The words seem like they would be a song, but a quick google search didn’t reveal any musical source. Thus I will assume that it is the original work of Esther’s mother. She seems like a lovely lady and a charming poet.

Today, on Mother’s Day, I hope you have a chance to thank the mother figures in your life for adding their own light to the sunshine in your life.

Mother's Poem Postcard message - Rochester 1910s

Dear Esther,

When your letter comes
If when I’m feeling blue
Comes a letter Straight from you
Blues all fade in just a minute
Ever I know what’s in it
If it comes when I am glad,
It cannot fail to add
[To] the sunshine of the day
One more happy golden ray.

Mother

Approximate year: 1910s, based on ink style, fonts, and printing.

Postcards

Another view of the Castle [1919 – Marseilles, France]

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 back lg

Through some quick census research, I’m fairly sure this postcard was sent by Herbert to his father. It boggles my mind that this postcard was sent nearly a century ago.

Tarascon-sur-Rhone Wikipedia

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 lg

Another view of the Castle. Am on my way to Taulon and St Raphael. Am in Marsailles now.

Yours

A. C. Umberger

To:

  • Mr. G. E. Umberger
  • 326 E. Bucyrus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio

From:

  • Herbert C. Umberger

Postmark: U.S. Army Post Office M.P.F.S. Mar 20, 1919

Postcards

Dead or Alive. [1910 – Vermont]

1910 Vermont Image lg

Wow, Gladys seems pushy.

Oh, and Happy St. Patrick’s Day.

1910 Vermont message lg

“Greetings Most True”

Jonny are you dead or alive. Why don’t you answer my letter. I wont probably get it unless you put it care of A. J. Macie. hope you will write a good long letter.

From Gladys

Postmark: North Sheldon, VT. April 18 1910

To:

  • Mr. Jonny Cabarra
  • Windsor, VT [?]

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Postcards

The Great War [1919, France]

great-war-postcard-apr-1919-backWartime postcards are among my favorite finds. This one features two famous Parisian landmarks on the reverse.

The Treaty of Versailles had been signed and Armistice Day was not far off when this postcard was censored by a U.S. Army Captain. The Great War was all but over for this soldier who apparently had some free time to visit Brussels. I can’t imagine what harrowing things he experienced during his service in Europe, but I am glad he seemed to make it through.

More information about WWI postcards via the Smithsonian National Postal Museum: http://arago.si.edu/record_76880_img_1.html

great-war-postcard-apr-1919

France Apr 8/19

Your kind letter received and was very glad to hear from you. Had a pleasant visit to Brussels Belg. and Paris. Oh you Paris. Hope this finds you well.

From

Ges[?]

Censored by Captain U.S. Army

To:

  • Mrs. R. P. Alexander
  • 3344 Ruckle St
  • Indianapolis, Ind. USA

Postmark: U.S. Army  with “Passed as Censored” Stamp

Image: Place de la Concorde, Paris. Obelisk with the Arc de Triomphe in the distance.

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A Merry Christmas to your very good self [1916, N.C.]

N.C. Christmas 1916N.C. Christmas 1916B

Postmark: Dec 22, 1916 –  Sandyridge, N.C.

To

  • Miss Era Shafor
  • Sandyridge N.C.

“A Merry Christmas to your very good self from your very good friends.”

I have been looking for a invitation to that dance for a long time[.] it is coming off [.] Hurry up[.] I want to dance some -?- had

R.F.D.

Postcards

Where’s my letter please? [1911, Pa.]

Pennsylvania 1911 front

Is this correspondence the equivalent of a girl not answering your calls, even though she gave you her number at that bar last night? Is the sender hostile or being facetious? Perhaps both?

Pennsylvania 1911 backPostcard Front

“2516 Boyles Ave, looking East, New Castle, Pa.”

Postmark: Oct 2, 1911 – New Castle, Pennsylvania

To

  • Miss Katheryn Fleming
  • Lorain, Ohio

Where’s my letter please?

Don’t think you ever intended writing to me. Now hurry, or I will be real mad.

Lovingly, –?-