Postcards

Greetings from Xochimilco [1920 – Mexico]

1920 Scenic Postcard Image - Xochimilco, Mexico lg

Reasons why I find this particular postcard fascinating:

  • Name: An addressee name I’ve never heard before: “Alphild” (a traditional Norse forname)
  • Uncommon date: Postcard popularity slowed in the 1920s, so this is one of the few I have from that decade.
  • Place: Xochimilco is a fascinating location. This postcard was sent before Xochimilco was incorporated into Mexico City in 1928, and retains its distinct identity today. Chinampa is the type of traditional agriculture practice here along the canals, and is a tourist attraction as well.
  • Content:  I always enjoy reading about how the sender got to their destination, and here William H. mentions a pleasant train journey. What a train ride to Mexico City must have been like in 1920 is fascinating to imagine.

1920 Scenic Postcard Message - Xochimilco, Mexico lg

Greetings from Xochimilco Mexico. Had a very pleasant train trip to Mexico City. The weather is Simply Magnificent. How was your trip home? And how is little Alphild?

My Best William H.

  • Misses Alphild & Evanna Larson
  • 5100 S. Cornell
  • Chicago, Ill
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: 17 April 1920 – Mexico


More about the location:

Xochimilco, Early 20th Century

Xochimilco, Mexico.

Ca. 1910-1919 Source: Flickr

Image from page 154 of

Further Reading: Xochimilco Wikipedia

Military Postcards, Postcards

No sign of moving yet [1919 – Bar-le-Duc, France]

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 back lg

The Treaty of Versailles had not yet been signed, but Umberger can certainly see the light at the end of the tunnel. With a location-less postmark from the U.S. Army Postal Service, there’s no telling exactly from where in Europe this postcard was sent.  Umberger would likely have been in the vicinity of Bar-le-Duc at some point to have acquired the image of this town in Northwest France. Hopefully he arrived back on American soil not long after his postcard did.

I have two postcards from this WWI soldier, A.C. Umberger. Here is the other, sent in March 1919.

Great War Postcard Feb 1919 lg

A pretty nice place. Hope to be home soon to play with you but there is no sign of moving yet.

Yours

A.C. Umberger

To:

  • Miss Jean T. Hunter
  • 326 E. Bucynus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio
  • U.S.A.

Postmark: U.S. Army Postal Service, Feb 18, 1919 / “Passed as censored” stamp

Image: Bar-le-Duc

Postcards

Affectionate Brother [India – London, 1908]

london-1908

More than a century ago, Fred sent this simple note to his sister in London from somewhere in colonial India. The building pictured on this card still exists at Mount Abu. See the modern building here: http://camahotelsindia.com/camarajputana/ The politics of colonialism are sticky subject at best, but that doesn’t take away from this being a snapshot of an interesting time period in history.

My favorite line: “I remain your affectionate Brother.” Siblings simply don’t address each other with such flowery language anymore. I am as grateful for the advance of modernity as the next gal, but text messages and twitter don’t compare to a quick handwritten message like this one.

If you can identify the postmark, please let me know!

london-1908-m

Image: “Mount, abu Club.”

Ds. W.

Just a few lines in answer to your letter hoping this will find you quite well as I am alright at present. Excuse card[.] will right letter next week[.] hoping Lizzie is quite well.

I remain your affectionate Brother Fred

To:

  • Ms. W. Ellens
  • 16 Lowndes Squ
  • Knightsbridge
  • London SW
  • England

Postmark: LONDON.S.W. Nov 9, 1908

Illegible Postmark (India) BOL–? (Stamp missing.)

 

Postcards

Rabbits [Indiana, 1909]

Indiana 1909Indiana 1909 back

This postcard from Horace has pretty good penmanship and I find the spelling errors charming. I am curious what was going on with those rabbits, though.

-23 -09

Dear Karl – I am going to school and Rabbits are very [sharp?]. Mr. Jackson is common down for for Xmas. I hope you all hapy Xmas. And a hapy new yr.

Respectfully yours. Horace F. Budd.

To:

  • Mr Karl Reiman
  • 2635 Northwestern Ave
  • Indianapolis, Indiana

Postmark: December 24, 1909 – Morristown, Ind.

Save

Postcards

Where’s my letter please? [1911, Pa.]

Pennsylvania 1911 front

Is this correspondence the equivalent of a girl not answering your calls, even though she gave you her number at that bar last night? Is the sender hostile or being facetious? Perhaps both?

Pennsylvania 1911 backPostcard Front

“2516 Boyles Ave, looking East, New Castle, Pa.”

Postmark: Oct 2, 1911 – New Castle, Pennsylvania

To

  • Miss Katheryn Fleming
  • Lorain, Ohio

Where’s my letter please?

Don’t think you ever intended writing to me. Now hurry, or I will be real mad.

Lovingly, –?-