Postcards

Another view of the Castle [1919 – Marseilles, France]

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 back lg

Through some quick census research, I’m fairly sure this postcard was sent by Herbert to his father. It boggles my mind that this postcard was sent nearly a century ago.

Tarascon-sur-Rhone Wikipedia

Great War Postcard Mar 1919 lg

Another view of the Castle. Am on my way to Taulon and St Raphael. Am in Marsailles now.

Yours

A. C. Umberger

To:

  • Mr. G. E. Umberger
  • 326 E. Bucyrus St.
  • Crestline, Ohio

From:

  • Herbert C. Umberger

Postmark: U.S. Army Post Office M.P.F.S. Mar 20, 1919

Postcards

Too much English in Paris [1950 – Paris, France]

1950 Paris Notre Dame Image lg

It’s so much fun to imagine Rilla’s trip across the pond and stay in Paris (minus being surrounded by seasick passengers). I’m not sure whether I admire her desire to integrate herself into French culture, or if she’s instead a little self-impressed with her own mastery of the local language.

Here’s a bit of historical context: The French Line in the 1950s.

1950 Paris Notre Dame message lg

Sept 30, 1950

Dear Margaret,

The ocean trip was wonderful. I love the French line. The food was out of this world. 6 courses for each meal. I was fortunate enough not to be seasick in spite of a storm the first three days which got most everybody.

I love Paris, but haven’t seen many of the sights yet. I’ve been room-hunting for a place in a private home. There’s too much English spoken at the Maison Américaine, a dormitory where I am now. It’s very cold here. Write.

Love, Rilla

To:

  • Miss Margaret Paschall
  • Route 2
  • Clarksville, Tenn.
  • U.S.A

Postmark: Paris XIV Av du General Leclerc – Sept 30, 1950

Stamps: 5 franc & 10 franc

Save

Save

Save

Postcards

Affectionate Brother [India – London, 1908]

london-1908

More than a century ago, Fred sent this simple note to his sister in London from somewhere in colonial India. The building pictured on this card still exists at Mount Abu. See the modern building here: http://camahotelsindia.com/camarajputana/ The politics of colonialism are sticky subject at best, but that doesn’t take away from this being a snapshot of an interesting time period in history.

My favorite line: “I remain your affectionate Brother.” Siblings simply don’t address each other with such flowery language anymore. I am as grateful for the advance of modernity as the next gal, but text messages and twitter don’t compare to a quick handwritten message like this one.

If you can identify the postmark, please let me know!

london-1908-m

Image: “Mount, abu Club.”

Ds. W.

Just a few lines in answer to your letter hoping this will find you quite well as I am alright at present. Excuse card[.] will right letter next week[.] hoping Lizzie is quite well.

I remain your affectionate Brother Fred

To:

  • Ms. W. Ellens
  • 16 Lowndes Squ
  • Knightsbridge
  • London SW
  • England

Postmark: LONDON.S.W. Nov 9, 1908

Illegible Postmark (India) BOL–? (Stamp missing.)

 

Postcards

Rain [Switzerland, 1966]

switzerland-1966-p

Intriguing because of its brevity, this postcard was presumably sent to make the recipient aware that the sender made it to Switzerland. The Liebensbergers clearly knew about this trip ahead of time, but they don’t know much more after reading this note.

switzerland-1966-m

Rain the first day.

  • Gw.
  • Mr. & Mrs. Paul Leibensperger
  • 201 9th St.
  • Shoemakersville, PA. 19555
  • U.S.A.

 

Postmark: Luzern, Switzerland – November 11, 1966

Image: Luzern, Kapellbrücke mit Pilatus (Luzerner Tracht) [Luzern, Chapel bridge with traditional dress]

Postcards

The Great War [1919, France]

great-war-postcard-apr-1919-backWartime postcards are among my favorite finds. This one features two famous Parisian landmarks on the reverse.

The Treaty of Versailles had been signed and Armistice Day was not far off when this postcard was censored by a U.S. Army Captain. The Great War was all but over for this soldier who apparently had some free time to visit Brussels. I can’t imagine what harrowing things he experienced during his service in Europe, but I am glad he seemed to make it through.

More information about WWI postcards via the Smithsonian National Postal Museum: http://arago.si.edu/record_76880_img_1.html

great-war-postcard-apr-1919

France Apr 8/19

Your kind letter received and was very glad to hear from you. Had a pleasant visit to Brussels Belg. and Paris. Oh you Paris. Hope this finds you well.

From

Ges[?]

Censored by Captain U.S. Army

To:

  • Mrs. R. P. Alexander
  • 3344 Ruckle St
  • Indianapolis, Ind. USA

Postmark: U.S. Army  with “Passed as Censored” Stamp

Image: Place de la Concorde, Paris. Obelisk with the Arc de Triomphe in the distance.

Postcards

Steel Holiday [Istanbul, 1977]

I once spent Christmas (when my husband was deployed) speaking German with a Greek friend, at her grandparents’ Gasthaus in Bavaria — not a blood relative of mine within several time zones. This postcard is from a sender who is also far from home at that time of year when most of us are trying to get “home.”

Spending the holidays away from home is always an interesting prospect. In this case, the sender is also undertaking a business endeavor — building a steel mill in Turkey. I do wonder if they completed the project within the two years they mention in the postcard.

If you too ever have the chance to spend the holidays in a more adventurous location, I recommend giving it a try.

istanbul-1977

istanbul-1977-2

12/11/77

Greetings from Istanbul, Turkey. Rausu[?] Engineers and I are trying to build a steel mill, hopefully before spring 1979.

Seems like a long way from Dearborn, Chicago and friends which makes holiday season a little more meaningful –

Ginny[?] & Joe Faloon

Kucuk Bebek Lad[?]

Bebek Istanbul Turkey

To:

  • Mr. & Mrs. James A Merry
  • 10316 West Charter Mall Rd.
  • Thiensville Wisconsin 53092
  • U.S.A.

Image: Istanbul – The mosque of Soliman the Magnificent and the Golden Horn          

Postmark: illegible, Turkish postage

 

 

                          

Postcards

Nice spot in the Azores [1953, Portugal]

Azores 1953 Vintage Postcard

I love this postcard. It’s so informal and full of life.

I wonder if 1SG (First Sergeant) Nikkel ever took a pass and made it out to this scenic spot in the Azores for a visit. I’m sure the islands were even more remote and exotic feeling in the 1950s than they are even still today.

Lajes Field, a small but strategically located air base in the Portuguese Azores out in the Atlantic Ocean remains an active part of the NATO foot print with strong U.S. Military influence.

Azores 1953 Vintage Postcard

Postmark: Missing (Azores, Portugal)

Handwritten Date: April 18, 1953

Stamp: Portugal

To:

  • Ex. Mo Senhor I ro. Sargento
  • Walter Nikkel
  • 1605 Air Police Sqdn. AATS
  • Lajes, Terceira

Front: S. Miguel—Açores—Lagoas Verde e Azul das Sete-Cidades  Foto Toste

18 April 53

I wish you & Mac are here with me. God damn it, this is a nice spot! Why don’t you take a 3-day pass (and Mac), & get the hell down here?! I am damn sure you both would like it [?] to!!

My best regards – [name?]

Aerial of Lajes Field 1950s